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  1. Assessment 1 item
    1. Assessment – Please note that the assessment process for the MSc and iBSc is different.  

      Oral presentation

      You are asked to present for fifteen minutes (8 minutes presentation followed by 7 minutes for questions) on your proposed dissertation topic. The presentation should cover: why this project is important; the research question; and research methods.

      The presentations will take place on Monday 26 and Tuesday 27 November.

      Written assignment

      Topic: Individual/household healthcare finance.

      Instructions

      Part I (1500 words):

      1.      Propose a research question to address any aspect of healthcare financing at the individual or household level in the context of one of the following countries: Peru, Ghana, South Africa, United States or Sri Lanka.

      2.      Sketch out a methodology to answer the given research question using a qualitative, quantitative, mixed-methods or literature-based study design appropriate to your research question.

      Part II (500 words):

      Provide a critique of the study you designed, outlining the underlying limitations.

      Part III (1000 words)

      Outline a complementary/supplementary study that would address the limitation(s) highlighted in part II. The design of the additional study must be different from the main study in part I, e.g., if the main study was qualitative, the complementary study must be a quantitative study or a literature-based/systematic review approach. If you designed a mixed quantitative/qualitative study for part I, you must use a literature-based study design for your critique.

       

      The written assignment is due on Friday 19 January at 2pm.

       MSc

      Oral presentation

      You are asked to present for fifteen minutes (8 minutes presentation followed by 7 minutes for questions) on your proposed Capstone topic. The presentation should cover: why this project is important; the research question; and research methods.

      The presentations will take place on Monday 26 and Tuesday 27 November.

      Written assignment

      Topic: Individual/household healthcare finance.

      Instructions

      Part I (1500 words):

      1.      Propose a research question to address any aspect of healthcarefinancing at the individual or household level in the context of one of the following countries: Peru, Ghana, South Africa, United States or Sri Lanka.

      2.      Sketch out a methodology to answer the given research question using a qualitative, quantitative, mixed-methods or literature-based study design appropriate to your research question.

      Part II (500 words):

      Provide a critique of the study you designed, outlining the underlying limitations.

      Part III (1000 words)

      Outline a complementary/supplementary study that would address the limitation(s) highlighted in part II. The design of the additional study must be different from the main study in part I, e.g., if the main study was qualitative, the complementary study must be a quantitative study or a literature-based/systematic review approach. If you designed a mixed quantitative/qualitative study for part I, you must use a literature-based study design for your critique.

      The written assignment is due on Friday 19 January at 2pm.

  2. Week 1: Introduction and Ways of Knowing. 26/9/18 15 items
    This session introduces the course structure, outcomes and assessment. It discusses the approach that we take to teaching research methods and how the module as a whole fits together. The tutorial session provides an opportunity to discuss any issues with your Capstone pairing for the MSc and your research protocol topic for the iBSc. We also look at what knowledge is, how we generate it, and which methods are able to produce which types of knowledge.
    1. Research design: qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods approaches - John W. Creswell 2003

      Book Core Chapter 1

    2. Knowledge translation of research findings - Jeremy M Grimshaw, Martin P Eccles, John N Lavis, Sophie J Hill 12/2012

      Article Core

    3. An open letter to editors on qualitative research - Trisha Greenhalgh, Ellen Annandale, Richard Ashcroft, James Barlow 10/02/2016

      Article 

    4. Qualitative methods for health research - Judith Green, Nicki Thorogood 2009

      Book  P. 3 - 34

    5. Strategies of qualitative inquiry - Norman K. Denzin, Yvonna S. Lincoln 1998

      Book  P.1 - 34

    6. Qualitative research practice: a guide for social science students and researchers - Jane Ritchie, Jane Lewis, Carol McNaughton Nicholls, Rachel Ormston 2014

      Book  P. 1 - 34

    7. Quality assurance of qualitative research: a review of the discourse - Joanna Reynolds, James Kizito, Nkoli Ezumah, Peter Mangesho 12/2011

      Article 

  3. Week 2: Introduction to Epidemiology 3/10/18 4 items
    In this session we will discuss basic epidemiological concepts including definitions, examples of different epidemiological study designs and evaluation techniques, and important considerations in epidemiology including bias, confounding and effect modification.
    1. Every Newborn: progress, priorities, and potential beyond survival - Joy E Lawn, Hannah Blencowe, Shefali Oza, Danzhen You 07/2014

      Article Core

    2. Essential medical statistics - Betty R. Kirkwood, Jonathan A. C. Sterne 2003

      Book 

    3. Basic Epidemiology (second edition) - R Bonita, R Beaglehole, T Kjellström

      Webpage 

  4. Week 3: Qualitative methods: approaches to qualitative research 10/10/18 12 items
    This is the first of three sessions on qualitative methods that introduces you to the main approaches to qualitative research: ethnography, grounded theory, action research and phenomenology. It explains the characteristics, strengths and weaknesses of each approach, alongside a discussion of the types of knowledge that tend to be generated by each approach. The second half of the session will be devoted to understanding how to ensure that qualitative evidence is robust, trustworthy and credible. There are many ways this can be achieved, but the most important are sampling and triangulation. We will examine these concepts in detail.
    1. No one sees the fathers: Israeli fathers' experience of feticide - Ronit D. Leichtentritt, Galia Weinberg-Kurnik 11/2016

      Article Core

    2. The SAGE handbook of grounded theory - Antony Bryant, Kathy Charmaz 2007 (electronic resource)

      Book 

    3. Qualitative methods in public health: a field guide for applied research - Priscilla R. Ulin, Elizabeth T. Robinson, Elizabeth E. Tolley, Ebooks Corporation c2005 (electronic resource)

      Book 

    4. Qualitative research: issues of theory, method and practice - David Silverman 2011

      Book  P. 75 - 111

  5. Week 4: Qualitative methods: data collection techniques 17/10/18 10 items
    This session introduces the different techniques that may be used to collect qualitative data, including interviews, focus group discussions, observation (participant and non-participant) and analysis of documentary evidence.
    1. The qualitative research interview - Barbara DiCicco-Bloom, Benjamin F Crabtree 04/2006

      Article Core

    2. Social research methods: a reader - Clive Seale 2004

      Book  Junker, B. The Field Work Situation: Social Roles for Observation

    3. InterViews: learning the craft of qualitative research interviewing - Steinar Kvale, Svend Brinkmann 2009

      Book 

    4. Social research methods: a reader - Clive Seale 2004

      Book  Lofland, J. Field Notes

    5. Qualitative research practice: a guide for social science students and researchers - Jane Ritchie, Jane Lewis, Carol McNaughton Nicholls, Rachel Ormston 2014

      Book 

    6. Social research methods: a reader - Clive Seale 2004

      Book  P. 253 - 269

    7. Qualitative research: issues of theory, method and practice - David Silverman 2011

      Book  Part 4 Interviews and Focus Groups P. 129 - 168

    8. Field research: a sourcebook and field manual - Robert G. Burgess 1982

      Book  The art of note-taking P. 195 - 199

  6. Week 5: Qualitative methods: ethics and qualitative data analysis 24/10/18 21 items
    This session provides an introduction to the ethical issues inherent in doing research and talks students through the process of applying for ethical approval through KCL. It also introduces students to the process of qualitative data analysis and illustrates the importance of analysis to the process of knowledge generation.
    1. General Readings 2 items
    2. Qualitative Data Analysis readings 4 items
      1. Qualitative research in health care - Catherine Pope, Nicholas Mays 1999

        Book 

      2. Qualitative methods in public health: a field guide for applied research - Priscilla R. Ulin, Elizabeth T. Robinson, Elizabeth E. Tolley, Ebooks Corporation c2005 (electronic resource)

        Book 

    3. Ethical Approaches to Qualitative Research readings 9 items
      1. Using Reflexivity to Optimize Teamwork in Qualitative Research - Christine A. Barry, Nicky Britten, Nick Barber, Colin Bradley 01/1999

        Article 

      2. Naturalistic inquiry - Yvonna S. Lincoln, Egon G. Guba 1985

        Book 

    4. Doing research with vulnerable groups 4 items
      1. Methodological Immaturity in Childhood Research? - Lesley-Anne Gallacher, Michael Gallagher 11/2008

        Article 

    5. Qualitative research practice: a guide for social science students and researchers - Jane Ritchie, Jane Lewis, Carol McNaughton Nicholls, Rachel Ormston 2014

      Book 

    6. Interpreting qualitative data - David Silverman 2014

      Book 

  7. Week 6: Reading Week. 29/10/18-2/11/18 0 items
  8. Week 7: Quantitative methods: study design 05/11/2018 6 items
    This is the first of four sessions looking at study design and methodologies for quantitative research. This session introduces the different types of study designs, including experimental and observational methods and the hierarchy of evidence. We will focus on the strengths and weaknesses of different study designs, and how the method relates to the research question being addressed.
    1. Core Reading 3 items
    2. Recommended Reading 3 items
      1. New evidence pyramid - M Hassan Murad, Noor Asi, Mouaz Alsawas, Fares Alahdab 08/2016

        Article 

  9. Week 8: Quantitative methods: Sampling, data collection and measurement 12/11/2018 9 items
    This session looks at the different methods that can be used to collect quantitative data in surveys and interviews, and explores how these different approaches could lead to bias. The second half of the session will introduce sampling in the context of quantitative research.
    1. Recommended Reading 6 items
  10. Week 9 Quantitative methods: Hypothesis Testing, Measuring Associations, Confounding and bias 19/11/2018 7 items
    This session will introduce the key measurements of association that are used in quantitative epidemiology, specifically: prevalence, incidence, odds ratios and relative risks.
    1. Recommended Reading 3 items
      1. Advances in mixed methods research: theories and applications - Manfred Max Bergman 2008

        Book  Chapter 1

      2. Toward a Definition of Mixed Methods Research - R. Burke Johnson, Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie, Lisa A. Turner 04/2007

        Article 

  11. Week 10: Introduction to evaluation methods for public health interventions 26/11/18 4 items
    The evaluation of public health interventions in global health is a diverse topic. We will discuss the different types of trial designs used to evaluate global health programmes including cluster randomised trials, before and after studies, regression discontinuity, amongst others. We will then consider the advantages and limitations of the different trial designs and discuss the role of implementation science in global health.
    1. Recommended Reading 2 items
      1. Cluster randomised trials - Richard J. Hayes, Lawrence H. Moulton 2009

        Book 

  12. Week 11 Literature reviews 03/12/2018 13 items
    This week we will focus on the techniques required to do a high-quality literature review. We will examine different kinds of approaches to literature reviews, including systematic reviews, narrative reviews and meta-narrative reviews. We will analyse the strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches, before discussing the appropriateness of each for different kinds of research question.
    1. Recommended Reading 5 items
      1. Comment on Greenhalgh et al. 2018 - Clovis Mariano Faggion 07/2018

        Article Recommended

      2. On being ‘systematic’ in literature reviews - Sebastian K. Boell, Dubravka Cecez-Kecmanovic

        Chapter Recommended

      3. Time to challenge the spurious hierarchy of systematic over narrative reviews? - Trisha Greenhalgh, Sally Thorne, Kirsti Malterud 06/2018

        Article Recommended

    2. RAMESES publication standards: realist syntheses - Geoff Wong, Trish Greenhalgh, Gill Westhorp, Jeanette Buckingham 12/2013

      Article 

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