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  1. Essential and recommended general texts to read before the start of the module 5 items
    Each session has Core (Essential) and Recommended Texts. Core texts must be read and summarized before the workshop session. In some sessions these will also form the basis for student presentations. Recommended readings and Additional follow-up readings help you to investigate an aspect from a session further or flag up studies related to specific countries. Your essay should include reference to these texts where relevant to your topic you’re your research should also go beyond them to find other material. For those who have little prior knowledge of health and health systems, here are some suggestions for background reading. These will provide you with perspectives on health and health policy that will be useful throughout the module. It is not required to buy the books as most material will be made available as online resources.
    1. Making health policy - Kent Buse, Nicholas Mays, Gillian Walt 2012

      Book Recommended

  2. Session 1: Public health, structural drivers and inequalities 12 items
    In the first week we introduce the course, discuss the expectations and the weekly outline. We discuss what is understood by ‘public health’ and how thinking around it has evolved in relation to ideas about illness and economic development. We then consider the burden of disease in rapidly growing economies and the underlying drivers of disease. The concept of intersectionality will be introduced to help understand social inequalities observed in patterns of ill-health.
    1. Core reading

    2. Making health policy - Kent Buse, Nicholas Mays, Gillian Walt 2012

      Book Core Chapter 1, pp 4-18

    3. Further reading:

    4. Intersectionality and why it matters to global health - Anuj Kapilashrami, Olena Hankivsky 06/2018

      Article Recommended

  3. Session 3: Road traffic injuries as a public health concern 16 items
    Road traffic incidents are the leading cause of death amongst people aged 15-29, yet are rarely seen as a priority concern for health. In this session we examine the burden of ill-health caused by road traffic incidents, the key risk factors and the interventions needed to improve public health. Our country case study this week is motorised transport and road safety in South-East Asia. The session introduces the ‘health policy triangle’ as a framework through which to analysis health policy, and we apply this to the case of one recent policy approach that has been used to formalise and extend public transport in urban settings: the bus rapid transit system.
    1. Core readings:

    2. BRICS: opportunities to improve road safety - Adnan A Hyder, Andres I Vecino-Ortiz 01/06/2014

      Article Core

    3. Further readings:

    4. Motivations for motorcycle use for Urban travel in Latin America: A qualitative study - Jonas Xaver Hagen, CarlosFelipe Pardo, Johanna Burbano Valente 07/2016

      Article Recommended

    5. Global status report on road safety 2015 - World Health Organization 2015

      Document Recommended

    6. South-East Asia case study

    7. Engaging policy makers in road safety research in Malaysia: A theoretical and contextual analysis - Nhan T. Tran, Adnan A. Hyder, Subramaniam Kulanthayan, Suret Singh 2009-4

      Article Recommended

    8. Road Safety Institutional and Legal Assessment Thailand - World Health Organization 2015

      Document Recommended Focus in particular on the range of key actors involved, and the problems with existing laws

  4. Session 5: The political economy of non-communicable diseases 19 items
    In the past two decades, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer, have emerged as the biggest causes of death in the emerging economies. This session introduces students to a political economy interpretation of the problem and its drivers. We will look at the complex international and domestic politics surrounding policy responses to these health issues. We will look at the complex politics surrounding policy responses, what influences the balance of prevention and treatment, and issues of trade, law and governance. Our case example is nutrition and activities by the global food and drink industry in Mexico.
    1. Core readings:

    2. Further readings:

    3. Health in All Policies: Seizing Opportunities, Implementing Policies - Sarah Cook 2013

      Webpage Recommended Chapter 8 Jenkins R. Minoletti A. ‘Promoting mental health: a crucial component of all public policy’ AND Chapter 10 Bettcher D, de Costa VL. (2013) ‘Tobacco or health’

    4. The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Is It Everything We Feared for Health? - Ronald Labonté, Ashley Schram, Arne Ruckert 17/04/2016

      Article Recommended

    5. Mexico case study:

    6. Exporting obesity: US farm and trade policy and the transformation of the Mexican consumer food environment - Sarah E. Clark, Corinna Hawkes, Sophia M. E. Murphy, Karen A. Hansen-Kuhn 03/2012

      Article Recommended

    7. In Mexico, Evidence Of Sustained Consumer Response Two Years After Implementing A Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax - M. Arantxa Colchero, Juan Rivera-Dommarco, Barry M. Popkin, Shu Wen Ng 03/2017

      Article Recommended

    8. Coca-colonization of diets in the Yucatan - Thomas L. Leatherman, Alan Goodman 2005-8

      Article Recommended

    9. The political economy of agri-food in Mexico - F Martinez, G Aboites

      Chapter Recommended

  5. Session 4: Working lives: how quality of employment affects health 19 items
    This session considers health and safety aspects of work, a range of policy responses including the ILO’s ‘decent work’ initiative, and how quality of employment might be measured in relation to health. We analyse the different actors and interests involved in preserving/undermining fair working conditions, and the issue of responsibility for workplace health in global production networks. Our country case study is the garment industry in Bangladesh: source of much of our clothing and site of the Rana Plaza industrial disaster. Who should be responsible for workers’ health in a globalised economy?
    1. Core reading:

    2. Health in All Policies: Seizing Opportunities, Implementing Policies - Sarah Cook 2013

      Webpage Core Chapter 7: Work, health and employment

    3. Further readings:

    4. The quality of employment and decent work: definitions, methodologies, and ongoing debates - B. Burchell, K. Sehnbruch, A. Piasna, N. Agloni 01/03/2014

      Article Recommended

    5. Filling a critical gap: measuring work policies that affect families globally - Jody Heymann, Kristen McNeill, Alison Earle 08/2013

      Article Recommended

    6. Earning a living, but at what price? Being a motorcycle taxi driver in a Sub-Saharan African city - Lourdes Diaz Olvera, Assogba Guézéré, Didier Plat, Pascal Pochet 07/2016

      Article Recommended

    7. Bangladesh case study:

  6. Session 2: Urbanisation and health: neighbourhoods and social exclusion 16 items
    This week we look at public health consequences of rapid economic growth, modernization and urbanization for emerging economies. We consider the range of ways in which physical and social environments affect health and well-being, with particular attention to social inequalities in urban health. China is used as a case example of the challenges posed for collective health in rapidly urbanising environments, including food supply and food safety, internal migration and urban growth. The session concludes with group-based analysis of visual materials from the urban environment in London.
    1. Core readings

    2. Geographies of health: an introduction - Anthony C. Gatrell, Susan J. Elliott 2015

      Book Core Chapter 6: Neighbourhoods and Health - this focuses on the USA, but you should use these ideas to think about how the urban environment affects health in emerging economy settings

    3. Making unhealthy places: The built environment and non-communicable diseases in Khayelitsha, Cape Town - Warren Smit, Ariane de Lannoy, Robert V.H. Dover, Estelle V. Lambert 05/2016

      Article Core

    4. Further reading:

    5. Contextualizing mental health: gendered experiences in a Mumbai slum - SHUBHANGI R. PARKAR, JOHNSON FERNANDES, MITCHELL G. WEISS 12/2003

      Article Recommended

    6. Shaping cities for health: complexity and the planning of urban environments in the 21st century - Yvonne Rydin, Ana Bleahu, Michael Davies, Julio D Dávila 06/2012

      Article Recommended

    7. China case study:

    8. Urbanisation and health in China - Peng Gong, Song Liang, Elizabeth J Carlton, Qingwu Jiang 03/2012

      Article Recommended

    9. Food supply and food safety issues in China - Hon-Ming Lam, Justin Remais, Ming-Chiu Fung, Liqing Xu 06/2013

      Article Recommended

  7. Session 9. Healthcare, poverty and Universal Health Coverage 15 items
    The majority of the world’s poor live in middle-income countries. This week looks at the interaction between poverty and illness, paying particular attention to the mediating roles of social structures and the dominant methods of financing healthcare. We examine the social implications of healthcare costs using the example of women who survive an obstetric ‘near miss’, and then critically analyse the emergence of ‘Universal Health Coverage’ as a concept to break the healthcare-poverty cycle. Who benefits from the prevailing models of UHC?
    1. Core readings:

    2. One illness away: why people become poor and how they escape poverty - Anirudh Krishna 2010 (electronic resource)

      Book Core Preface (pp. xi-xvii) and Chapter 4 (pp. 69-95)

    3. Further readings:

    4. What does universal health coverage mean? - Thomas O'Connell, Kumanan Rasanathan, Mickey Chopra 01/2014

      Article Recommended

    5. Political and economic aspects of the transition to universal health coverage - William D Savedoff, David de Ferranti, Amy L Smith, Victoria Fan 09/2012

      Article Recommended

    6. Beyond body counts: A qualitative study of lives and loss in Burkina Faso after ‘near-miss’ obstetric complications - Katerini Tagmatarchi Storeng, Susan F. Murray, Mélanie S. Akoum, Fatoumata Ouattara 11/2010

      Article Recommended

  8. Session 6. Commercialisation and the trajectory of markets in healthcare 20 items
    This week introduces the idea of markets in the healthcare sector. We use the concept of commercialisation to review ways in which healthcare systems have changed over the past 40 years and some of the social, political and economic drivers of these changes. These changes are unpacked by thinking about the flows (‘mobilities’) in people and money and we explore some of the latest commercialisation developments in the healthcare sector, including the growing markets for healthcare investment, intermediaries and insurance.
    1. Core readings:

    2. Commercialization of health care: global and local dynamics and policy responses - Maureen Mackintosh, Meri Koivusalo 2005

      Book Core Chapter 1 (pp. 3-21): Health Systems and Commercialization: In Search of Good Sense

    3. De-constructing the financialization of healthcare - BM Hunter, SF Murray

      Article Core A pdf for this working paper has been provided on KEATS

    4. Further readings:

    5. Transforming health markets in Asia and Africa: improving quality and access for the poor - Gerald Bloom 2013

      Book Recommended chapter by Kanjilal B, Mazumdar S. ‘Transition in the Indian Healthcare Market’

    6. Trade in health-related services - Richard D Smith, Rupa Chanda, Viroj Tangcharoensathien 02/2009

      Article Recommended

    7. Case studies

    8. Commercialisation and extreme inequality in health: the policy challenges in South Africa - Di McIntyre, Lucy Gilson, Haroon Wadee, Michael Thiede 04/2006

      Article Recommended

  9. Session 7. Consumption, place and healthcare 13 items
    This session introduces students to ideas about place from medical geography and sociology and considers how these may help us to analyse and understand the ‘consumption landscapes’ of healthcare that have emerged in middle income countries in an era of neoliberalisation. We consider the types of data available for studying place in healthcare, and the appropriate methods for data collection and analysis. Our case study is the concept of the ‘medicity’; most closely associated with India but increasingly apparent in other emerging economy countries.
    1. Core readings:

    2. Emplacing India's “medicities” - Susan F. Murray, Ramila Bisht, Emma Pitchforth 11/2016

      Article Core

    3. Further readings:

    4. Building a biopolis - David Cyranoski 2001-7-26

      Article Recommended To access the article through this link you may need to log in to Nature (right hand side of page towards foot) and follow Institutional Login

    5. A Space for Place in Sociology - Thomas F. Gieryn 08/2000

      Article Recommended

    6. Patterns of middle class consumption in India and China - Christophe Jaffrelot, Peter van der Veer 2008

      Book Recommended Chapter 4 (pp. 88-109), by B Lefebvre ‘The Indian Corporate Hospitals: touching Indian middle-class lives’

    7. Architecture and health care: a place for sociology - Daryl Martin, Sarah Nettleton, Christina Buse, Lindsay Prior 09/2015

      Article Recommended

    8. Case studies

  10. Session 8. Global care chains and the offshoring of reproductive labour 19 items
    This week continues our analysis of how mobilities in people have manifested within healthcare economies using the example of transnational mobility of the healthcare workforce. We use the global care chain concept to consider how these mobilities affect social relations, varyingly reproducing and challenging gendered and racialised assumptions in the destination and source country of healthcare workers. In the second part of the session we focus on mobilities in body parts using the examples of global organ trades and the markets in assisted reproduction. These markets have been permitted by social and technological changes, and while some argue they are empowering, others argue they are exploitative. Should commercial surrogacy be legal?
    1. Core readings:

    2. The affective economy of transnational surrogacy - Carolin Schurr, Elisabeth Militz 16/04/2018

      Article Core

    3. Further readings:

    4. What about the workers? The missing geographies of health care - J. Connell, M. Walton-Roberts 01/04/2016

      Article Recommended

    5. Introduction: The gendered geographies of ‘bodies across borders’ - Beth Greenhough, Bronwyn Parry, Isabel Dyck, Tim Brown 02/01/2015

      Article Recommended

    6. Transnational mobilities for care: rethinking the dynamics of care in Asia - SHIRLENA HUANG, LENG LENG THANG, MIKA TOYOTA 04/2012

      Article Recommended

    7. Case studies

  11. Session 10: Global health governance for the 21st century 17 items
    This week we examine the governance of global health and the changing fortunes of different institutions over the past 40 years. Drawing from across the previous nine weeks in the module, we consider the range of actors that now influence health, health policy and healthcare systems in emerging economy countries. The concept of health diplomacy is introduced as we think about how this range of actors interact with one another, with particular focus on the positions adopted by emerging economy countries as global health actors. The session concludes with discussion on how the interests of particular actors has driven the advancement of particular health issues at the expense of others. What should we think about philanthrocapitalism in health?
    1. Core readings:

    2. Globalization and health: pathways, evidence and policy - Ronald N. Labonte, Ted Schrecker, Corinne Packer, Vivien Runnels 2012

      Book Core Chapter 12: Global governance for health

    3. Global health diplomacy: A critical review of the literature - Arne Ruckert, Ronald Labonté, Raphael Lencucha, Vivien Runnels 04/2016

      Article Core

    4. Further readings:

    5. Global health is public health - Linda P Fried, Margaret E Bentley, Pierre Buekens, Donald S Burke 02/2010

      Article Recommended

    6. Towards a common definition of global health - Jeffrey P Koplan, T Christopher Bond, Michael H Merson, K Srinath Reddy 06/2009

      Article Recommended

    7. Two Regimes of Global Health - Andrew Lakoff 2010

      Article Recommended

    8. Global health and international relations - Colin McInnes, Kelley Lee 2012

      Book Recommended Chapter 2 (pp. 23-48)

    9. Recent Shifts in Global Governance: Implications for the Response to Non-communicable Diseases - Devi Sridhar, Claire E. Brolan, Shireen Durrani, Jennifer Edge 2013-7-23

      Article Recommended

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